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Battcon Conference Schedule

Battcon features papers and presentations by industry specialists. Papers are carefully selected by the Battcon Technical Committee, are noncommercial and address important issues relative to the audience. The program also includes four panels of experts who will discuss hot topics and offer cutting-edge solutions. Attendees will also have an opportunity to participate in an open forum panel, designed to resolve issues raised during the conference. Three concurrent workshops, each geared toward a segment of the stationary battery industry: telecommunications, utility, and UPS are offered on the second day. Workshop content is driven by the audience and varies dependent on the interaction among the attendees. Full-conference badges are required to attend conference sessions, panels and workshops.

Pre-Conference Seminars  are offered on Sunday, before the official start of the conference. Attending one of these seminars can reinforce existing skills, expand battery knowledge, and explore industry trends. Seminars are led by well respected, industry professionals. Content focuses on batteries, technical aspects of the DC system, manufacturing, maintenance, testing issues as well as advanced battery technologies. Seminars can be beneficial to the novice or seasoned battery professional to better understand batteries or material presented at the conference. The seminars are offered at a $99 additional cost. The first seminar begins at 8:00 AM and runs through 12:00 PM. Afternoon seminars run concurrently from 1:30 PM to 5:30 PM.

Sunday, April 22, 2018

7:00 AM

Registration open for morning seminar attendees
Tennessee Lobby

8:00 AM

Implementing a NERC Compliant Battery Maintenance Program
Cheekwood ABC

Instructors: Tom Carpenter, Chair (Tennessee Valley Authority), Bill Cantor (TPI), Mike Nispel (Quality Standby Services, LLC), Chris Searles (BAE Batteries USA), Kurt Uhlir (Standby Power System Consultants, Inc.)

NERC PRC-005 requires owners to implement a battery maintenance program that meets certain requirements. There are various options allowable in the implementation of the maintenance program. There are also supplemental guides and FAQs associated with PRC-005 that attempt to help the users understand the requirements. This seminar will help users understand why PRC 005 was developed, provide an interpretation of the requirements by battery and utility experts, provide some in-depth understanding on how ohmic readings can be used, and provide user experiences of actual implementations.

1:30 PM The following three seminars take place concurrently

Stationary Battery Basics
Tennessee B

Instructors: Rick Tressler, Chair (Rick Tressler, LLC), John Kim (EnerSys)

Stationary Battery Basics is designed to help those new to the battery industry. Numerous topics will be covered that are needed on a basic level to understand and learn as they work with these sometimes-mysterious electro-chemical devices. Have you ever wondered why a lead-acid battery cell operates at 2 volts, compared to other chemistries such as Nickel Cadmium or Lithium? How should batteries be charged? What is float service? What are the maintenance requirements? What is a VRLA battery and how does it differ from a VLA battery? How do I get the longest service life out of my battery? This seminar will cover the fundamentals of the lead-acid battery and will help get you up to speed for the conference. Instructors John Kim and Rick Tressler are industry experts with many years of experience and are looking forward to meeting you and answering your questions.

Beyond the Fundamentals: Advanced Topics in Lead Acid Batteries
Tennessee A

Instructors: Curtis Ashton, Chair (CenturyLink), Mike Nispel (Quality Standby Services, LLC)

This seminar provides additional, in-depth information for attendees who need a more in-depth understanding of their battery systems. Beyond the Fundamentals explores five key topic areas that will assist in understanding more about what goes on inside as well as outside a battery. These topics include discussions on the following: Advanced lead acid fundamentals; application, selection, and considerations for both conventional flooded and VRLA types; data collection; record keeping; IEEE recommendations; warranty; and trending health; failure modes; the aging process; warranty issues, and end of life determination; periodic visual inspection criteria, where problems arise, and causes of troubles throughout the service life of a battery.

Focus On: Advanced Battery Technologies
Cheekwood ABC

Instructors: Jim McDowall, Chair (Saft America), Randy Schubert (Telcordia NIS, a Division of Ericsson, Inc.), Babu Chalamala (Sandia)

Advanced battery technologies such as lithium-ion are the go-to solution for grid-connected energy storage systems, and are now being proposed for use in traditional standby applications. In this seminar, attendees will receive in-depth information on lithium-ion technologies and will also learn about other new battery types, such as advanced lead-acid, flow and sodium-beta. Suitability for standby operation will be covered, and guidance on selection and evaluation will be provided. The treatment of these newer technologies in fire codes is evolving and can have a major influence on ease of deployment, so the latest situation for codes and related standards will be discussed.

5:30 – 7:30 PM | Welcome Reception

(Badges Required. All registered attendees, and those registered as Guest or Expo invited) Water’s Edge

Monday, April 23, 2018

7:00 AM

Registration Opens
Tennessee Lobby

7:00 AM

Speaker Ready Room for Monday Presenters and Panel Members
Information session for Monday presenters and panel members. Breakfast will be available.

Davidson D

7:00 AM

Continental Breakfast
(Full-Conference attendees. Not available for Expo or Guest registrants)
Tennessee Lobby

8:00 AM

Conference Begins / Opening Address
(Open to Full-Conference Registrants)
Tennessee CDE

8:30 AM

Moving Energy Through Time – Predictions for Stationary Energy Storage
Chris Campbell, VP, Business Development, Vertiv Critical Energy

Our electric power grids are among the most complex networks ever created by man. The way we generate and consume electricity is changing, and the complexity of managing the grid will continue to increase. Storage technologies, especially batteries, dramatically change the real-time nature of power grids by allowing energy to be moved through time. Storage acts as a shaping asset, changing the profiles of energy production and consumption, making power grids more resilient, and mitigating the potential for disruption created by new energy technologies. This presentation will examine several predictions for the future of energy storage. We will consider the drivers behind these predictions and assess the future impact they may have on our power grids. The presentation will address the ability of distributed storage to simplify power grid management, the impact of electric vehicle adoption on transmission and distribution investment, the evolution of battery technology to meet future grid requirements and efforts among regulators to keep up with these changes. The audience will come away with an understanding of the current state of stationary energy storage and the drivers behind several major predictions regarding how the storage landscape may evolve.

9:00 AM

Presentations 2 and 3
Tennessee CDE

Battery Systems in a Substation: Manitoba Hydro’s Experience with Alternative Technologies
Konstantinos Stamatis, Engineer, University of Manitoba/ Manitoba Hydro

Utilities use a variety of battery systems in their substations as backup power for critical systems. These batteries need to meet stringent requirements not only due to the nature of their application but also due to the physical conditions of their installation. These conditions along with changes in regulations, requiring additional redundancy, compel the utilities to investigate new battery technologies for substation applications. FIAMM 110V Sodium-nickel and SAFT 125V Li-ion battery systems have been chosen by Manitoba Hydro for testing and evaluation for use in their substations and subsequent replacement for the existing vented lead acid (VLA) and valve-regulated lead acid batteries (VRLA). As such, a comprehensive set of experiments are underway to characterize the operation of these with attention to the way they age and how aging affects their ability to meet substation load demand. This is critical as batteries are assets that need to perform their function over a prolonged period and with high performance. Testing includes exposing the batteries to their expected substation load profiles and observing their charge/discharge behavior while measuring key variables including internal resistance, cell voltage, and temperature. The aim of the study is to determine which technology provides the best combination of cost, longevity, reliability, serviceability (maintenance requirements), environmental footprint, and adaptability to the specific load profiles of a utility substation. Battery aging is emulated through an accelerated process (temperature) to determine how these batteries deteriorate over time. Test results are used to develop battery models that include the impact of aging by characterizing the changes in the battery model parameters. By developing such a model through extensive testing the operators will be able to determine with accuracy the aging conditions of a battery pack by taking measurements of its terminal quantities. This enables a preventative maintenance program, which will contribute to circumvent unexpected failures, save unnecessary maintenance costs, and improve service quality and reliability.

Predicting the Life of Li-ion Batteries Using the Arrhenius Model
Sneha Lele, Associate, Exponent

The use of Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries has expanded rapidly in the past few years. A number of these applications have significantly increased the requirements placed on the batteries and their operating environment. Unlike consumer electronic devices, these applications require the batteries to continue operating for long periods of time, often exceeding 10 years. When selecting a Li-ion battery it is important to estimate the battery’s performance given the operating conditions in the application. Over the years, many techniques and models have been proposed to estimate a Li-ion battery’s life in an application.

Many different methodologies of accelerated aging and extrapolation of the accelerated aging data have been proposed. One such methodology relies on the Arrhenius equation which assumes that the capacity degradation of Li-ion cells is predominantly temperature dependent. The methodology relies on predicting battery life based on accelerated aging tests that are typically performed for 12 to 16 weeks at different ambient temperatures. This paper presents the results of the accelerated aging tests performed on a small form factor Li-ion cell and the capacity degradation predictions that were made using the Arrhenius equation. The experiments were performed for one year at different temperatures and states of charge. The paper will present the results of the capacity degradation predictions made by the Arrhenius equation, comparing the predictions with actual capacity degradation observed over one year of testing.

10:00 AM

Break
Tennessee Lobby

10:30 AM

Presentations 4, 5 and 6
Tennessee CDE

Exploring and Untangling Battery Performance Data
Sepehr Mogharei, Director VOLTiFiC Technology, Inc.

As battery technology advances, we are seeing a growing trend of problems surrounding batteries and their inconsistencies in the accuracy and detail of data published by manufacturers. Lack of adequate oversight from regulatory bodies at local, national or international level over integrity and quality control of battery performance data only swells the issue. While everyday news shines a spotlight on some of these issues in commercial and consumer battery segments, the underlying problems are shared across all segments including industrial. End users are faced with the near impossible task of verifying and performing quality control on purchased batteries. Electricians lack centralized systems for accessing key battery data such as short circuit or torque ratings. Integrators are running the risk of under sizing batteries for mission critical applications.

Manufacturers are left with outdated application engineering techniques which hinder both innovation and sales required to usher in the next generation of smart batteries, battery monitoring and testing equipment, chargers and UPS systems. This study is part of a larger research that evaluated all available battery published data for secondary battery segment (>5AH). Observations, obstacles, and solutions are being shared with purpose of improving compliance and application design of batteries.

Battery Modeling – The Future of Sizing Calculations?
Jim McDowall, Business Development Manager, Saft America, Inc.

IEEE battery sizing has its roots in a paper by E.A. Hoxie, published in 1954. The principles of that paper were adapted to a standards document for lead-acid batteries with IEEE Std 485, first published in 1978. A nickel-cadmium version based on the same principles, IEEE Std 1115, followed in 1992. While these documents have stood the test of time, their origins from before the days of personal computing are clear. Even though most manufacturers have adapted these standards to computer sizing programs, there remain shortcomings for certain applications, such as those with numerous load steps, very long discharge times, or continuously variable loads. New technologies such as lithium-ion are being promoted for standby applications, it is worth considering whether it is time to adopt an alternative approach. This paper describes the use of battery modeling as an alternative to traditional sizing techniques, specifically relating to lithium-ion technology. The versatility of such an approach is undeniable, but questions remain. Manufacturers may have different levels of sophistication in their models, and validation could be an issue. Nevertheless, modeling represents an attractive option for battery sizing, raising the question whether IEEE sizing standards may at some point become obsolete.

Alternative Battery Sizing Method for End-of-Life Run Time
Robert Malley, VP Quality and Process Engineering, C&D Technologies

End of life run time is the critical sizing factor for battery systems – especially for large data centers and other high-power applications. Current recommended practice is to oversize battery systems based on product watt-hour capacity. Battery design and testing practice, however, determine life based on reduction of run time at fixed energy discharges. Using run time as the basis for determining product sizing matches industry practice and provides for more efficient system sizing. This paper will discuss multiple methods of calculating end of life particularly at less-than one hour runtimes, and give the audience the knowledge they need to make decisions about proper battery sizing to ensure safe and reliable operation of their mission-critical sites.

12:00 PM

Lunch
(Full-Conference attendees. Not available for Expo or Guest registrants)
Tennessee Lobby

1:30 PM

Panel Discussion: When is the System Reliable Enough
Tennessee CDE
Bill Cantor (TPI Engineering), Bill Malley (C&D Technologies), Dan Martin (Ameren), Tom Carpenter (Tennessee Valley Authority), Ed Rafter (Switch)

2:45 PM

Break
Tennessee Lobby

3:15 PM

Panel Discussion: Batteries in Natural Disaster
Tennessee CDE
Curtis Ashton (CenturyLink), Randy Schubert (Ericsson), Matt McConnell (NRC), David Franklin (IEEE)

5:30 PM to 9:00 PM

Trade Show and Reception
(Badges Required. All registered attendees, and those registered as Guest or Expo invited)
Gaylord Event Center

5:30 PM to 9:00 PM

Trade Show and Reception
(Badges Required. All registered attendees, and those registered as Guest or Expo invited)
Gaylord Event Center

9:00 PM – 11:00 PM

After Party, Sponsored by East Penn
(Open to all registered attendees, and those registered as Guest or Expo invited)
Tennessee CDE

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

7:00 AM

Registration
Tennessee Lobby

7:00 AM

Speaker Ready Room for Tuesday Presenters and Panel Members
Information session for Tuesday presenters and panel members. Breakfast will be available.
Davidson D

7:00 AM

Continental Breakfast
(Full-Conference attendees. Not available for Expo or Guest registrants)
Tennessee Lobby

8:00 AM

Opening / Announcements
(Open to Full-Conference Registrants)
Tennessee CDE

8:10 AM

Presentations 7, 8 and 9
Tennessee CDE

“Squaring Safety” The Application of Lithium-ion Batteries into Critical Infrastructures
Mayo Tabb, Director Strategic Sales, Vertiv

Lithium-Ion batteries (LIB) are displaying promising benefits when used in conjunction with uninterruptible power supply (UPS) systems. Alongside these benefits lay questions from professionals regarding the installation and safety aspects of utilizing LIB compared to the traditional valve-regulated lead-acid. Developing alongside right behind these moves are the codes and regulations required to effectively embrace LIB technologies. During this presentation, we will evaluate the UL standards and the recent NFPA 2018 Fire Code, including a new 5-page Section 5.23 on how to safely deploy LIB for Data Center applications. These requirements go into effect for Lithium-Ion systems that exceed 20KWh which equates to approximately a 50 kVA UPS. This presentation will look closer at LIB performance as an energy storage solution and share insights in their application.

New Energy in the Battery Infrastructure
Laurie Florence, UL LLC

Over the past several years, there has been a significant effort to address energy storage system (ESS) safety, especially those systems that utilize batteries as their source of energy. New technologies that do not have a long history of use in the built infrastructure are being utilized. Based on this, there is concern from regulators, fire marshals, electrical inspectors, building owners and other industry stakeholders with the safety of these systems and how to best integrate them. Development of product safety standards and installation standards, and updating of building codes to address these concerns have been ongoing. This work has culminated in the publication of UL 9540 to evaluate the safety of energy storage systems as well as the ongoing development of NFPA 855 standard for energy storage system installation; publication of Article 706 and updates to Article 480 of the NEC; updates to NFPA 1 and ICC IFC fire codes. This presentation will provide an overview of how an ESS product is evaluated for safety using UL 9540 and provide how the traditional technology lead acid system of Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) being evaluated to UL 1778 is impacted when becoming an ESS.

Understanding Downstream Risk from Lithium-Ion Battery Thermal Runaway & Designing for Safety
Ryan Spray, Sr. Managing Scientist, Exponent, Inc.

With continued advances in battery technologies, batteries have become one of the leading solutions for not only portable power applications, but also energy storage applications. Because of the high-energy density in a battery, a key safety goal is preventing the unintended release of stored energy. A catastrophic failure of a battery pack can occur if one or more cells undergo a thermal runaway event that results in a rapid release of the stored energy. Thermal runaway can lead to a release of flammable gases and heat, which can potentially result in fire and explosions. The design of effective thermal management systems or fire mitigation systems requires proper quantification of the thermal failure characteristics. This presentation will detail several research activities that have been developed to analyze and quantify thermal safety aspects of batteries and identify/quantify potential toxicology hazards. This process involves real-time gas analysis from lithium-ion battery failure events, as well as post-failure composition analysis and identification of gas combustion properties. The implications of this work toward designing for safety will be discussed

9:40 AM

Break
Tennessee Lobby

10:10 AM

Presentations 10, 11 and 12

Intermittent VRLA Charging: A Mostly Bad History, but is There a Better Way?
Curtis Ashton Sr. Lead Power Tech Support Engineer, CenturyLink

Intermittent charging of VRLAs has been around for a long time, and sometimes there is no choice (the application can only charge intermittently: think for example, of vehicle engine-starting VRLAs, and standalone photovoltaic applications). Intermittent charging by choice has also been tried many times as a potential way to lengthen battery life. In most cases, this has failed miserably in its goal. This paper will examine the theory behind why intermittent charging should work in lengthening life if done properly, as well as show examples of how it has been done improperly, and why it didn’t work.

Is it Time to Take a Serious Look at Convection Cooled Switched Mode Rectifier/Chargers Again?
J. Allen Byrne, Consultant, Brass Tacks Power System Advisors

Switched Mode Rectifier/chargers (SMR’s) are the dominant method of charging stationary batteries in the telecom, data and many other standby power applications. The vast-majority of these SMR's are forced air cooled. In North America, the exception is with industrial and utility companies who still favor older linear technologies, mainly Silicone Controlled Rectifiers (SCR’s). So why the reluctance of utility companies to use the lighter, more efficient and user friendly to adopt SMR’s? This presentation will explore the issues and argue the case for a second look at convection cooled SMR’s. The objective of this presentation is to be an educational thought changer. Topics discussed will include; history, reliability, efficiencies, maintenance, pros and cons, and costs.

Future Powering Challenges. Is the Industry Ready to Accept Change?
George Pederson, Principal Associate, Carrann Associates, LLC

In the not too distant past the selection of a battery and charger for a standby application was a relatively simple process. The largest markets for these power systems were in telecommunications and utilities each with a specific set of requirements. Today the requirement for standby power continues to grow, but how relevant are the products and practices that we know and trust in this new marketplace. This paper will examine the challenge of powering this next generation of integrated infrastructure. From solar powered data centers, to 5G networks, do the traditional system configurations match the actual user requirements? With the introduction of Lithium and other new battery technologies, are the charging systems capable of meeting the required charging profiles to minimize the risk of fire and other potential catastrophic events? This paper will also look at a new category of product being introduced to meet some of these challenges.

11:40 AM

Lunch
(Full-Conference attendees. Not available for Expo or Guest registrants)
Tennessee Lobby

1:10 PM

Load Testing - It's not a Slam-Dunk
Tennessee CDE
Rick Tressler (Rick Tressler, LLC), Jose Marrero (Southern company services), Lesley Varga (Quality Standby Services), Tom Cantor (TPI engineering), George Pederson (Carrann Associates, LLC)

2:20 PM

Hall of Fame Award Presentation

2:30 PM

Break
Tennessee Lobby

3:00 PM | Workshops

(Three run concurrently, select the one that best suits your area of interest)

UPS Workshop: UPS Battery Systems
Cheekwood ABC

The UPS workshop will be an interactive session, with audience participation, discussing UPS battery systems. We will explore topics such as VRLA vs. VLA battery systems, sizing for appropriate backup time, battery system designs, charging techniques, installation, testing/commissioning, and maintenance. We welcome questions and topics from the audience.

Utility Workshop: Electric Utility Batteries and Chargers
Tennessee A

This workshop is for those interested in the use and issues of batteries and chargers in electrical utilities. The workshop will feature an open atmosphere where attendees are encouraged to bring up questions they have about their dc equipment and get answers/feedback from the moderators and other attendees. Bring your concerns and expertise for an interactive session to obtain and share knowledge. Some topics that may be discussed include: NERC Standard PRC-005 impacts; NERC Standard PRC-005 requirements vs. IEEE recommendations; New and recently issued/updated IEEE standards; and New technologies.

Telecom Workshop: Telecom Battery Open Season/Session
Tennessee B

This audience participation session will discuss the major problems associated with telecom batteries, from supplier problems to user abuse. Also, appropriate backup times for various types of telecom services in an evolving competitive and regulatory market will be addressed. Finally, we’ll discuss other pertinent points the audience would like to bring up.

5:00 PM to 8:30 PM

Trade Show and Reception
(Badges Required. All registered attendees, and those registered as Guest or Expo invited)
Gaylord Event Center

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

7:00 AM

Registration
Tennessee Lobby

7:00 AM

Speaker Ready Room for Wednesday Presenters and Panelists
Information session for Wednesday presenters and panel members. Breakfast will be available.
Davidson D

7:00 AM

Continental Breakfast
(Full-Conference attendees. Not available for Expo or Guest registrants)
Tennessee Lobby

8:00 AM

Opening / Announcements
(Open to Full-Conference Registrants)
Tennessee CDE

8:10 AM

Presentations 13, 14, 15 and 16

Technique for Data Retention and Restoration for Systems Monitoring Batteries at Remote Sites
Duncan Brown, Sr. Software Developer, NDSL, Inc.

Monitoring systems are being widely deployed as a maintenance practice by many industries including data centers, telecommunications, rail, and power utilities. Maintaining and managing the data collected can be challenging especially as these systems are deployed across numerous locations. While there are various practices for data sampling frequency and reporting intervals, companies often overlook the backup and data restoration elements for their monitoring systems. Without proper backup of critical information such as baselining records, system configuration, reports, historical records, and fault history it would be extremely difficult to bring a system back up to its original state following a failure of the monitoring system or catastrophic event. This paper will explore what records need to be maintained and propose a best practice for record keeping and restoration management in support of electronic monitoring of battery systems. While the practices can be applied across multiple industries, this paper will highlight the best practices for remotely distributed systems such as found in power utilities. Where it is beneficial, application will be made for co-located large deployments such as data center environments.

A Ten-Year Perspective for the Preparation and Delivery of a Battery Technician Training Curriculum Based on IEEE P1657 in Theory and Practice
Ed Rafter, Vice President of Critical Operations for Switch

This paper will present a summary of the success and challenges in the preparation and implementation of training based on IEEE 1657. The IEEE document defines the areas of recommended knowledge for installers and maintainers of stationary batteries and related systems to the extent that they affect the battery. The purpose of the IEEE document is to provide an outline of the necessary items that should be covered by those developing training programs for stationary battery installation and maintenance personnel. A review of recent progress in curriculum development, implementation and modifications will be presented. Training efforts both as a seminar event and a training and development course to data center technical staff will be examined. Track candidates practical experience Observations and Recommendations will be presented that can be followed in preparing such a curriculum for battery maintenance training.

Impact of Alloy and Geometry on VLA Positive Grid Designs
Eric Lehmann, Product Manager, C&D Technologies

Historically, a true 20-year life VLA battery meant a thick positive plate, usually 0.25” or larger. New materials and improved designs have resulted in an overall reduction of plate growth and grid corrosion, making it possible to achieve longer life with thinner plates. This paper will share results of life testing and field data to show that new materials and designs have eliminated grid corrosion as the primary failure mode of modern VLA batteries, allowing for 20-year life cycles with thinner plates. Attendees will learn what changes can be made to their battery specifications without compromising the longevity of their battery system

Battery Room Safety Requirements - What Has Changed
Jeff Donato, National Operations Manager, EnviroGuard

Changes in requirements to meet battery room compliance can be a challenge. Local authorities having jurisdictions often have varying requirements based on areas. This paper addresses the minimum requirements from Local, State and Federal requirements as well as historical trends in various areas where local AHJs have changed requirements. Based on data collected, additional requirements that AHJs may impose on facilities in various regions or cities will be presented. Updates in the building code as it relates to battery racks and seismic protection and the differences between UBC, IBC, IEEE and NEBS seismic requirements will also be presented.

10:00 AM

Break
Tennessee Lobby

10:30 AM

Presentations 17, 18, and 19
Tennessee CDE

Avoiding Troublesome Battery Installations
Rick Tressler, President, Rick Tressler, LLC

An excellent way to ensure a user will have a long-lived standby battery system, with minimal trouble along the way, is to begin with a good installation. Reliability truly begins here. The trouble seems to be that in more than a few cases, installation crews and management personnel alike somehow just seem to get it wrong. Whether it is failure to inspect the shipment, someone missing tightening several bolted connections or failing to observe polarity, things can go very badly during installation as well at start-up. Acceptance tests therefore, can become complete disasters as a result. This paper will look at the most common mistakes that create a troublesome installation not only for the installer, but for the end user and maintenance operators. Installation errors can and do cause years of trouble for users. Suggestions for avoiding these troubles in the first place will be discussed. The author’s hope in the end is that project personnel whether management or wrench-turners will give the battery installation the attention it justly deserves, considering its vital role as an emergency power support system.

How to Evaluate Time-Adjusted Battery Capacity Results
Volney Naranjo, Senior Applications Engineer, Megger

Battery load testing provides an accurate measurement of a battery capacity, furthermore, load testing is the only proven method to measure the capacity and determine the state of health of a battery. IEEE standards and industry literature, such as IEEE Std. 450 and manufacturers’ guides explain in detail how to perform the test along with pass and fail criteria. Due to the length and nature of the test, a great amount of information is logged prior to and while it is running, especially if individual cell voltages are recorded.

All this information can be utilized to perform a detailed analysis of the battery and individual cells; not merely indicating the percentage capacity. In most electrical tests, if questionable readings are obtained, it is possible to repeat a test right away to confirm a previous measurement or to try different conditions for further analysis. In battery load testing this is not as simple and not recommended, because it could reduce the life of the battery. This paper presents the results, corresponding observations and, analysis of multiple time-adjusted capacity tests performed on the same battery at different discharge rates.

Time (Only) Referenced Battery Rundown Test
David Essi, Founder and Chief Technologist, LABRA Technology

IEEE standards call for periodic tests to verify a battery performance. a performance or modified performance capacity test of the entire battery bank. A performance test using load banks with individual strings tested off-line is prohibitively expensive and time-consuming. In conjunction with ohmic testing, another popular gauge to validate reserve capacity is a test known as the rundown test. It is particularly useful in applications with sufficient load as in telecom. Most DC power plants incorporate a feature to automate this test, which amounts to lowering the plant voltage so the battery bank powers the load instead of the chargers. A simpler, more insightful rundown test could be standardized if there was a gauge that could reliably predict reserve time. With such a gauge, it would then be possible to provide a more intuitive test referenced to time only (and not end-voltage) that also provides a better understanding of the predicted battery reserve time. The inner workings of such a gauge and how it can be applied will also be presented.

All this information can be utilized to perform a detailed analysis of the battery and individual cells; not merely indicating the percentage capacity. In most electrical tests, if questionable readings are obtained, it is possible to repeat a test right away to confirm a previous measurement or to try different conditions for further analysis. In battery load testing this is not as simple and not recommended, because it could reduce the life of the battery. This paper presents the results, corresponding observations and, analysis of multiple time-adjusted capacity tests performed on the same battery at different discharge rates.

11:45 AM

Boxed Lunch
(Boxed lunches ae available for Full-Conference Registrants. Not available for Expo of Guest registrants)
Tennessee Lobby

12:00 PM

Demo Sessions & Wrap-up Panel (please bring your boxed lunch)
Tennessee CDE
Demos
Proper Application of NO-OX
Ohmic Measurements
Measuring SG